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Reminder: OSHA 300A forms must be posted and new Final Rule released

February 5, 2019 at 1:31 pm

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) mandates that all employers who are required to maintain the OSHA 300 Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses post a summary of the previous year’s log between Feb. 1 and April 30 each year, even if no incidents occurred in the preceding calendar year. The summary (OSHA Form 300A) must be certified by a company executive and posted in a conspicuous location where notices to employees are customarily posted.

All employers who had more than 10 employees at any point during the last calendar year are covered by this requirement unless they qualify as part of an exempt low-risk industry. A full list of the industries exempt from OSHA routine recordkeeping requirements (including posting Form 300A) can be found in the Guides section of the HR Support Center by searching “partially exempt industries.” It’s called “OSHA Fact Sheet: Reporting and Recordkeeping Rule and Partially Exempt Industries List.”

The OSHA Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses (Form 300), Summary (Form 300A) and Instructions can be found in the Forms section of the HR Support Center by searching for “OSHA Form 300.” It’s called “OSHA Form 300, 300A, 301, and Instructions.”

Electronic submission requirements:
OSHA-covered employers with 250 or more employees, and those in certain high-risk industries with 20-249 employees, must electronically report their Calendar Year 2018 Form 300A data by March 2, 2019. Reporting must be done through the online Injury Tracking Application (ITA).

All affected employers must submit injury and illness data in the ITA online portal, even if the employer is covered by a State Plan that has not completed adoption of their own state rule.

Additional information, covered-employer criteria, FAQs, and the Injury Tracking Application can be found on OSHA’s site, here.

New Final Rule Regarding Electronic Submission of Form 300 and Form 301
OSHA recently published a Final Rule to amend its recordkeeping regulations to remove the requirement to electronically submit information from the OSHA Form 300 (Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses) and OSHA Form 301 (Injury and Illness Incident Report) for establishments with 250 or more employees that are required to routinely keep injury and illness records. These requirements were never enforced but are now officially off the books.

Strovis Payroll & HR helps companies keep up with government regulations. For a free quote or demo, go to www.strovispayroll.com.

Categories: Uncategorized.

HR Snapshot: If you close your worksite due to inclement weather, are you required to pay employees?

February 4, 2019 at 2:00 pm

At Strovis Payroll & HR, we help companies deal with labor laws every day. In this HR Snapshot, the issue of paying employees if a business closes due to inclement weather is the focus.

Many businesses closed across the nation during the recent Polar Vortex, and myriad businesses closed along the Atlantic coast last year because of tropical storms and hurricanes. So what are businesses required to do when putting employees out of work when Mother Nature demands they do so?

Non-exempt employees need to be paid only for actual hours worked plus any reporting time pay that may be required by the state (this sometimes applies when employees show up for work but are sent home early).

Exempt employees, on the other hand, must be paid when the employer closes due to inclement weather, whether they do any work or not. You may require exempt employees to use accrued vacation or paid time off for the day if that is your regular practice when the workspace closes. However, exempt employees without enough paid time off to cover the absence must still be provided with their regular salary during the closure.

Many companies have an inclement weather or emergency closure policy for these sorts of situations. These policies typically address communication in the event of worksite closures and options for employees. You might, for example, allow employees to work from home. If you don’t have a policy like this in place, now might be the time to implement one.

Find out how Strovis Payroll & HR can help you by requesting a quote or a demo at www.strovispayroll.com.

Categories: Uncategorized.

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